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Discussion Board 3 replies must include a bible reference in each also must put the student name on the paper so I know which reply belongs to who.

Linda Student 1
In reviewing Lydia’s and John’s situation appear to be in a denial state of their abilities. Based on their current living conditions, it seems that John and Lydia have been independent their whole lives with little assistance from others. Recently John suffered a fall and spent time away from Lydia. With John being the more independent body and being injured, Lydia showed sign of being unable to care for herself due to her mental capacity and limited physical abilities. The couple, who are already refusing assistance has no support from family with getting assistance. In fact, their son is encouraging and supporting their decision to decline assistance.  As they age, they will continue to display terminal decline mentally and physically. Daily task will become more difficult for the couple. 
Additionally, the  couple shows signs of cognitive deterioration, but because of the lack of knowledge regarding each of their genetic vulnerabilities, medical history or any form of baseline on their health, it is difficult to determine why Lydia is deteriorating quicker than John (Broderick, 2015). 
I would recommend that John and Lydia have in home visits from a nurse or social worker one to two times a week to check on their wellbeing. Also, request that a mental health evaluation be conducted on the couple to see if there are any early signs of possible Dementia and or Alzheimer’s disease.  Once a base line is determined, the results be discussed with the family to provide a proper health plan for the couple or if they need to be transferred to a full-time assistant living.
                                                                                                           Reference
Broderick, P.C., & Blewitt, P., (2015). The Life Span: Human development for helping professionals. Pearson.
3 hours ago
Alexandria Student 2
Case Study
John and Lydia are in a situation that many elderly couples are in, they want their independence of living in their homes but unfortunately; they are not set up for success. John’s physical limitations are induced by his environment, he is sleeping on a bed at an inappropriate height which is causing problems with his balance. With every fall it further weakens his balance and his strength. Lydia’s progressive confusion is concerning because although she is physically able to get around, she is not able to upkeep or manage the home. Although he is cognitively more with it than his wife his physical limitations and her confusion are worrisome because the home is becoming unsanitary.
            Although they have 2 sons, they are not in a position to make the best decisions on behalf of their parents. One son is estranged, and the other son is doing less than the bare minimum for his parents’ quality of life. The son may be suffering from burn out from dealing with his own mental health and his family (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015). It seems this couple is relying on each other to get things in the home done and are in need of serious help.
             As a protective service worker, I would need their doctor’s information, if they have an official diagnosis, John’s psychical limitations or concerns, the severity of Lydia’s confusion. I would need to know how they move around the house, which amenities they use the most.
            Some services or options I would suggest, maybe a home health aide for 3 days out the week consistently to help with the cleaning and maintenance of the home. This is a good option because they are able to negotiate pricing and get the services they need from a company specialized in helping elderly people. If staying in their home is important to them, then we would need to allow them access to the second floor. I would suggest installing a stairlift and safe guarding the bathroom. That opens their home back up to them. It will relieve some of the stress from their son, allows Lydia and John to be more sanitary by using the bathroom and prayerfully limit the amount of falls John has because he will be in a higher bed.          
            While opening up the home to them does allow them to be more sanitary, we still encounter the challenge of them not wanting to spend money. If the doctor finds that John and Lydia are not fit to make decisions for themselves then we can got through the process to assign a power of attorney. An objective party that will spend the money that needs to be spent but has not personal investment in short-changing their quality of life.
            My final suggestion would be to make the necessary adjustments to having them spend their final days in their home together. At their age and their length in marriage, separating them and moving them out of their element is a death order.
Broderick, P., & Blewitt, P. (2015). The Life Span: Human Development for Helping Professionals (Fourth ed.). New York, NY. Pearson Education.
James Student 3
When I examine the cognitive and physical limitation of John and Lydia, and look at their limited social support, there mental function has become a real factor, it is evident that John and Lydia are in the finale stage of their development. They are experiencing mental and physical fatigue, and are becoming a hazard to themselves and potentially others. I would also recommend looking into Brodrick and Blewitt’s self-determination theory, (Broderick and Blewitt, 2014) Erickson’s last stage notes that in this stage, life becomes more positive, He says, “Retirement allows the individual to reflect upon the choices that have been made throughout the  course of life. Reviewing one’s life in a positive manner allows the individual to experience 
satisfaction. Alternatively, a negative life review can leave the individual with feelings of regret. We conducted one of the few studies on identity revision and maintenance processes during late 
adulthood.” (Sokol, 2009) 
The additional information that would be helpful to fully evaluate the living conditions in their house would be; knowing what prescription they are taking, knowing how they do without each other for periods of time, and examining the need for assistant living or home care. It may well be the final stage of their life, and independence is something we longed for as young people and loath when we get it. None-the-less, John and Lydia can have a life that ends well, with planning and support, John and Lydia can live out the remainder of their life in such a way that allows them retain some dignity yet giving them the support and care they desperately need for safe and healthy living. It will require adjustments from all parties involved; however, it can be done and John and Lydia can end their life well.
If I were the protective service worker for Joh and Lydia, I would help them understand the need of accepting help and the need for additional care from outside providers. I would also assist them in producing a budget for the additional care they need and would suggest that they consider paying for a contractor to install a bathroom on the first floor or make other safe and healthy alternatives. Sometimes, explaining the needs that are required to stay in the home help individuals who are in the latter stages of life understand that they can afford to spend the money to make these improvements. I would also attempt to include the son that was involved and seek out opportunities for better health and safety for John and Lydia. In these latter stages of life, it is important to maintain a social network with individuals that can check in on them from time-to-time. An in-home health nurse or a live-in care taker may be what is needed for John and Lydia to stay in their home.   
References:
Broderick, P. & Blewitt, P. (2013) The Life Span: Human Development for Helping Professionals (2nd Ed.), Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall
            Sokol, J. (2009) “Identity Development Throughout the Lifetime: An Examination of 
Eriksonian Theory,”Graduate Journal of Counseling Psychology: Vol. 1: Iss. 2, Article 14. 
Available at:http://epublications.marquette.edu/gjcp/vol1/iss2/14